HOAR KANT DIE or A Big Headed Arrogant Little Twat.

I said I was hot, yes? I am hot. WET HOT!

More photos from the weekend can be found here.

Did you hear the one about Richard Ashcroft going on a bender and running into a school demanding he be allowed to save the children? It was pretty funny at the time.

Here's some wisdom for you: "Being Welsh means dealing with a massive inferiority complex about everything, and a sense of humour almost entirely based on taking the piss."

Rodney Dangerfeild said that. He was not lying.

They cut my phone off today and tomorrow I am signing a publishing deal. I think this is funny. The song I wrote last night was about being in New York. It feels like I know, intimately, this whole life over there that doesn't exist when I'm here. That whole, when a tree falls in the woods does it make a sound thing. I used to be like, duh, yes, when I heard that one. I'm not so sure now. What's a "tree" anyway?

I don't tend to remember my dreams, unless they're nightmares. A little while ago, I was remembering my dreams more than usual, anyway. They were all terrorful. I am currently in a period of not remembering any at all. Like, the last one I have any vague knowledge of seemed to last years. This reminds me of those children's adventures in Narnia.

Someone, sometime, said that, when we realise that were are nothing but characters in someone else's dream... then we are self-aware.

I realised that I realised that last night.

Where this leaves me, I am not sure.

"I used to say, 'Of course I drink and take drugs, I'm in the entertainment industry. It goes with the territory.' But that was convenient justification for what I was doing. After I got sober, I realised I didn't take cocaine because I was in the entertainment business but the entertainment business attracts a lot of people who drink and take drugs." Why is that? "Because available in the entertainment business is one of the most powerful and headiest narcotics on the market - it's called approval. My accountant does not, when he's walking down the street, have people come up to him and say, 'You don't know me, but I loved your audit.' When you go out on stage and people clap you, that's a mood-altering experience. But it doesn't fix you and you go back for more. Two thousand people might cheer you and love you but it's not quite enough." Chris Langham, talking to The Guardian